5 Weeks Pregnant: Preparing for a Healthy Pregnancy

Your baby is still pretty small—about the size of a beauty mark. He resembles a small tadpole as the beginnings of a spinal  develop and form a tail. His umbilical cord has formed, and your placenta is hard at work helping to deliver nutrients and keeping the bad stuff away from his fragile body.

Perhaps you are wondering if you should tell your family and friends the good news. It’s important to examine the pros and cons and make this choice with the help of your partner. You may need time to adjust to the news and to discuss options with your partner for your pregnancy and beyond (Keep working? Work part-time? Quit your job?). If you’re employed, you may want time to consider how to discuss your pregnancy with your employer.

Plus, the first three months are the most common time for miscarriage. Some women prefer to keep the news quiet until the baby has had time to get settled, while others prefer to share their pregnancy with close friends and family so they’ll have support, if needed.

In the meantime, if you haven’t already, now is a great time to begin forming habits that will contribute to a healthy pregnancy. This includes regular exercise and getting ample nutrients to support your growing baby. You’ll gradually want to work up to 300 more calories a day in your second trimester.

Your diet should ideally consist of whole grains, fruits, vegetables and lean protein. Go light on the saturated fat (for example, red meat and whole-milk dairy products) and aim for as few processed foods as possible. Don’t eat raw or undercooked seafood or meats or unpasteurized milk, cheese and juices.

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6 Weeks Pregnant: Emotional Ups and Downs

And that circulatory system that was just starting to form last week? Well, this week it may be fully functioning, with a tiny heart pulsing 100 to 160 times each minute. Additionally, she’s starting to develop buds that will eventually grow into arms and legs, as well as a pituitary gland that will spur the formation of muscles, bones and a brain.

If your mind keeps wandering between feelings of elation and anxiety, you should know that this is normal. You may be excited wondering whether your baby will have your mother’s nose or your partner’s eyes—and concerned about the big life changes ahead of you. Many women feel continual mood shifts at this point in pregnancy.

Mood swings occur for a number of reasons, both external and internal. If there are things happening around you, such as problems at work or family issues, they can seem even more intense in light of your pregnancy. Don’t think that you need to suffer in silence during these conflicts. Consider talking things over with your partner, a close friend, your health care professional or a licensed counselor.

But your may also be related to hormone fluctuations, which can make you dancing-on-the-tabletops happy one minute and sobbing-in-the-fetal-position sad the next. It may help to remind yourself that your shifting emotions are a perfectly normal part of pregnancy. Additionally, relaxing activities like taking a nap, going for a walk, getting a massage or doing some light yoga can help slow your thought process and bring your mind back to its normal state.

Click Here for More Information  – 6 Weeks Pregnant

7 Weeks Pregnant: Your Baby’s Brain Cells Are Quickly Forming

His brain isn’t all that’s coming along; she’s also growing other integral organs, such as a heart and kidneys. In fact, he likely has a heart rateof about 100 beats per minute at this point. Additionally, your baby may be developing a tongue, arms and legs.

Toward the end of your seventh week, your child is nearly double the length he was at the beginning, reaching roughly 13 millimeters, with the head making up the majority of the volume.

Even though your baby is no bigger than a berry at seven weeks, you may begin to feel pressure on your bladder. This isn’t only due to your expanding uterus, but also an increase in a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which helps to get blood flowing to yourpelvis. This is a good thing, because blood flow stimulation allows you to better get rid of waste, and hCG plays an integral role in placenta development—so just try to remember that the next time you’re racing to the bathroom.

You may also keep in mind that some women experience alleviation in their constant need to go once they enter their second trimester. But it also may reappear toward the end of your pregnancy when your little one settles down into your pelvis, leaving not much space for your bladder.

What’s important to remember is that even though your urge to urinate may seem intense and never-ending at times, don’t try to cut down on time spent in the bathroom by forgoing fluids. You and your baby need to remain hydrated, and a lack of fluids may cause a urinary tract infection, which is most unpleasant.

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8 Weeks Pregnant: Preparing for Your First Prenatal Visit

If you could see your baby, you’d notice that she has teeny webbed fingers and toes and perhaps even small eyelids that will soon cover her sensitive eyes. The very tip of her nose may also be starting to form, as well as the upper lip. Behind the face, nerve cells are beginning to connect with one another and form what will eventually become complex neural pathways.

A little farther down, your baby’s breathing tubes are developing to reach her lungs. Moreover, her very important aortic and pulmonary valves in her heart have formed, helping the muscle to beat at an amazing 150 pulses per minute.

If your pregnancy is considered high risk, you’ll likely have already been to see your health care provider. However, for many pregnancies, the first prenatal visit takes place somewhere between now and week 10.

At your first appointment, your health care provider will complete a comprehensive health history. He or she will ask whether you have any medical or psychosocial issues, the date of your last menstrual period, your history of birth control methods and other medications, if you’ve previously been hospitalized, whether you have any drug allergies and about your family’s medical history. You may want to write down these details if you think you could have trouble remembering everything.

The visit will include measuring your blood pressure, height and weight, as well as a breast and pelvic exam, with a pap test if you haven’t had once recently. They’ll also likely take blood to test for your blood type,anemia and other medical and genetic conditions. It’s still a little early to hear your baby’s heartbeat, so this exciting milestone may have to wait until your next visit.

Your health care provider may also talk to you about more extensive genetic testing and offer you screening tests that can give you some information about your baby’s risk for Down syndrome as well as other chromosomal problems and birth defects.

There is a new two-part prenatal screening that can be done between weeks 9 and 13. It combines a blood test and a specialized ultrasound to assess your baby’s risk for Down syndrome or trisomy 18. This screening is less invasive than amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) but is not definitive. If risk is indicated, the screening may help you decide whether you want further testing.

If so, CVS is a genetic test that can be performed between weeks 10 and 12 of pregnancy. The doctor removes a small piece of your placenta to check for potential genetic problems. Although CVS cannot detect neural tube defects, some women prefer it because they can get results sooner than with an amniocentesis, which is usually done between weeks 15 and 18.

Both tests are invasive and include a very slight risk of complications, including miscarriage, so it’s important to do your research and talk to your partner and health care professional to decide what testing is right for you.Click here to learn more about genetic testing.

Finally, your provider may speak to you about lifestyle considerations, including nutrition and exercise. Bring a list of questions regarding your concerns and current habits. Now is the time to ask about activities that you are concerned about continuing during pregnancy.

You also might want to ask about the practice’s birth philosophy to make sure it’s in line with your own. For instance, if your goal is to have a natural childbirth, talk to them about it and make sure they are supportive of your plans.

If you leave your visit doubting your choice of providers, keep in mind that you can always change practices if you feel uncomfortable or are concerned that their philosophy of childbirth differs from yours. If you want to continue with the provider you’ve chosen, you’ll likely schedule an appointment for four weeks later before leaving the office.

For more Information  click  this link – 8 Weeks Pregnant

9 Weeks Pregnant: Time to Go Bra Shopping

If you could view your baby in detail, you might see that the tail formed by his spine, called the embryonic tail, is now gone. You’d also observe that he has little

earlobes and fully formed eyes, even though his lids will stay fused shut until around week 27.

Things you wouldn’t quite be able to see include her heart, which may now have four distinct chambers and developing valves, and his forming nerves and muscles.

Additionally, he likely has teensy teeth and external sex organs, though you still can’t view them even with an ultrasound.

Your baby is also likely moving around a lot, though you probably can’t feel it, unlike the discomfort that you may be experiencing in your breasts. While sore,

swollen breasts are one of the very first signs of pregnancy, now may be the time when you notice this symptom the most because your milk-producing glands are

expanding in preparation to feed your little one.

In addition, pregnancy hormones may be causing growth in your breast tissue, so don’t be surprised if your bras no longer fit well. This enlargement will keep going

for another month or so. (If you and your partner are loving this new change in your body, run with it. After all, the increased blood flow to your pelvis may mean

that you’re friskier than ever.)Also, you may notice more visible blue veins as they expand to deliver blood to your breasts and itchiness as the skin stretches. To

alleviate itchiness and minimize stretch marks, you can moisturize your breasts (and belly too!) with cocoa butter.

For more Information – 9 Weeks Pregnant

8 Weeks Pregnant: Preparing for Your First Prenatal Visit

If you could see your baby, you’d notice that she has teeny webbed fingers and toes and perhaps even small eyelids that will soon cover her sensitive eyes. The very tip of her nose may also be starting to form, as well as the upper lip. Behind the face, nerve cells are beginning to connect with one another and form what will eventually become complex neural pathways.

A little farther down, your baby’s breathing tubes are developing to reach her lungs. Moreover, her very important aortic and pulmonary valves in her heart have formed, helping the muscle to beat at an amazing 150 pulses per minute.

If your pregnancy is considered high risk, you’ll likely have already been to see your health care provider. However, for many pregnancies, the first prenatal visit takes place somewhere between now and week 10.

At your first appointment, your health care provider will complete a comprehensive health history. He or she will ask whether you have any medical or psychosocial issues, the date of your last menstrual period, your history of birth control methods and other medications, if you’ve previously been hospitalized, whether you have any drug allergies and about your family’s medical history. You may want to write down these details if you think you could have trouble remembering everything.

The visit will include measuring your blood pressure, height and weight, as well as a breast and pelvic exam, with a pap test if you haven’t had once recently. They’ll also likely take blood to test for your blood type,anemia and other medical and genetic conditions. It’s still a little early to hear your baby’s heartbeat, so this exciting milestone may have to wait until your next visit.

Your health care provider may also talk to you about more extensive genetic testing and offer you screening tests that can give you some information about your baby’s risk for Down syndrome as well as other chromosomal problems and birth defects.

There is a new two-part prenatal screening that can be done between weeks 9 and 13. It combines a blood test and a specialized ultrasound to assess your baby’s risk for Down syndrome or trisomy 18. This screening is less invasive than amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) but is not definitive. If risk is indicated, the screening may help you decide whether you want further testing.

If so, CVS is a genetic test that can be performed between weeks 10 and 12 of pregnancy. The doctor removes a small piece of your placenta to check for potential genetic problems. Although CVS cannot detect neural tube defects, some women prefer it because they can get results sooner than with an amniocentesis, which is usually done between weeks 15 and 18.

Both tests are invasive and include a very slight risk of complications, including miscarriage, so it’s important to do your research and talk to your partner and health care professional to decide what testing is right for you.Click here to learn more about genetic testing.

Finally, your provider may speak to you about lifestyle considerations, including nutrition and exercise. Bring a list of questions regarding your concerns and current habits. Now is the time to ask about activities that you are concerned about continuing during pregnancy.

You also might want to ask about the practice’s birth philosophy to make sure it’s in line with your own. For instance, if your goal is to have a natural childbirth, talk to them about it and make sure they are supportive of your plans.

If you leave your visit doubting your choice of providers, keep in mind that you can always change practices if you feel uncomfortable or are concerned that their philosophy of childbirth differs from yours. If you want to continue with the provider you’ve chosen, you’ll likely schedule an appointment for four weeks later before leaving the office.

For more Information  click  this link – 8 Weeks Pregnant

10 Weeks Pregnant: Alleviating Morning Sickness

Week 10 is at the very beginning of your baby’s fetal period, during which time she’ll do most of her tissue and organ development. The foundation has already been laid, because her kidneys, intestines, brain and liver are all there and beginning to get to work doing their respective jobs and continuing to develop.

Her extremities are also making some serious progress. Her fingers and toes have probably lost their webbing and are beginning to grow teensy nails at the ends. Moreover, her joints are allowing for some serious movement, including kicking and flexing of the wrists. If you could see her, you might notice a bit of peach fuzz on her delicate skin, as well as a bulging forehead that contains her swiftly developing brain.

Feeling happier, but still a little nauseous? No worries. You’re not alone here, because about half of all women experience morning sickness, which, despite its name, is as likely to happen at dinnertime as it is breakfast. You may be vomiting multiple times a day or perhaps it’s just a constant feeling of nausea.

No one knows exactly what causes nausea and subsequent vomiting during pregnancy, but it is often attributed to a combination of hormones and other physical changes. The good news is that for half of the women who experience morning sickness, their symptoms will go away by 14 weeks of pregnancy. If you were underweight before pregnancy and are not gaining a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy, it could affect your baby’s weight, so talk to your health care professional. You also may want to discuss your morning sickness if:

The vomiting or nausea is severe, especially if you can’t keep down any food or drinks for more than 12 hours or you see blood in the vomit

You see signs of dehydration, such as dark or infrequent urine or dizziness when you stand

You have abdominal or pelvic pain or cramping

Your heart is racing

You lose more than 5 pounds

Morning sickness isn’t usually harmful to women or their babies, but it is unpleasant. Make every effort to keep taking your prenatal vitamin to maintain healthy nutrients for your developing baby. If you have trouble keeping it down, try taking it at night or with a snack or chew gum or suck on hard candy after taking the vitamin. If these steps don’t help, talk to your health care provider.

Here are some things you can try to help prevent nausea and vomiting, keeping in mind that they don’t always work for everyone:

Eat smaller meals often throughout the day, avoiding an empty stomach.

Drink fluids regularly, particularly 30 minutes before eating. Water, ginger ale, lemonade and other cold, clear, carbonated or sour fluids are good choices. You also may want to suck on ice chips or ice pops.

Eat plain crackers, such as saltines, because the salty, neutral flavors have been shown to calm tummies. Some women find it helps to eat a few crackers or piece of dry toast before getting out of bed in the morning to settle an empty stomach. Foods that are high in carbohydrates and low in fat may be easier to digest.

Smell fresh lemon, mint or orange, either fresh or using an oil diffuser.

Steer clear of greasy, fatty and spicy foods, if they seem to upset your stomach. That plateful of nachos or loaded pizza before bedtime may not be a great idea.

Avoid foods and smells that trigger your nausea. This varies from person to person and may even vary from one pregnancy to the next, but, for some women, perfume, coffee, chemicals and smoke are common triggers.

Avoid visual or physical motion, such as flickering lights, driving mountain roads or going on a boat.

Get a breath of fresh air when you need to, because getting overheated may add to feelings of nausea, and exercise may alleviate them. Weather permitting, open windows when you can.

Wear an acupressure or “seasickness” bracelets, which can be found in drugstores. Acupuncture and hypnosis are other alternative treatments that some women find helpful.

Your health care professional also may talk to you about taking supplements, such as vitamin B6 and doxylamine, or antihistamines or other anti-nausea medicines. Do not take any supplements or medications without discussing them with your health care professional.

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